Irish Cycling Campaign Submission on Primary Wellbeing Curriculum

Earlier today (Fri 07 June 2024), Irish Cycling Campaign made a submission in response to the public consultation on the new Primary Wellbeing Curriculum. We have posted a copy of it below. 

We note here that the consultation is open until 5pm on June 18th. This new curriculum will encompass both Physical Education and Social, Personal and Health Education and is the first revision of the curriculum since 1999. This curriculum will most likely be in effect for the next few decades in our primary school system, so it’s essential that we have a stronger focus on cycling within it.

Do please take 10 mins over the coming days to send in your own request that utility cycling and cycling as transport be given a prominent role within the final draft.

Written submissions can be sent to [email protected] from now until 5pm on June 18th. More on the background to the consultation can be read via this link.

And we wish to sincerely thank our Irish Cycling Campaign volunteers for their excellent work on the submission that you can read just below.


Dear Sir / Madam,

Irish Cycling Campaign
(formerly Cyclist.ie, the Irish Cycling Advocacy Network), is the national organisation of cycling advocacy groups, greenway groups and bike festivals on the island of Ireland. We are the Irish member of the European Cyclists’ Federation.  Our vision is for an Ireland with a cycle friendly culture, where everyone has a real choice to cycle and is encouraged to experience the joy, convenience, health and environmental benefits of cycling.

We are very thankful for the opportunity to submit our observations of the new draft Wellbeing Curriculum Specification and fully support its vision to holistically empower children with skills across subjects such as Social, Personal and Health Education (SPHE) and Physical Education (PE) to live healthier, more connected and happier lives. 

Our submission has been drafted by a number of primary teachers supported by experts in paediatric health with direct experience of delivering support to children of all mobilities.

Introduction:

The Irish Cycling Campaign believes that cycling should be an integral component of the physical education curriculum, aimed at fostering holistic development and promoting well-being among primary school students. The inclusion of cycling aligns with the overarching aims of the curriculum, as outlined below:

1. Physical Well-being: Cycling encourages regular physical activity, contributing to the development of cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and overall physical health. Through cycling, students enhance their motor skills, coordination, and balance, laying the foundation for a healthy and active lifestyle.

2. Social Well-being: Cycling offers opportunities for social interaction and collaboration, promoting teamwork, communication, and peer support. Group cycling activities foster a sense of community and belonging, while also cultivating empathy and respect for others.

3. Emotional Well-being: Engaging in cycling activities can have positive effects on mental health and emotional well-being. Riding a bike provides a sense of freedom, independence, and achievement, boosting self-esteem and confidence. Moreover, outdoor cycling experiences promote connection with nature and community, reducing stress and promoting relaxation.

4. Cognitive Well-being: Cycling stimulates cognitive development through problem-solving, decision-making, and spatial awareness. Navigating different terrains and traffic conditions requires critical thinking and concentration, enhancing students’ cognitive skills and resilience.

5. Climate Responsibilities: Children cycling not only benefit from the activity themselves but also contribute positively to mitigating climate change. By adopting cycling as a mode of transport, students reduce their carbon footprint, thereby fostering a sense of environmental stewardship from a young age. Emphasising the climate responsibilities associated with cycling empowers students to recognize their role in addressing global environmental challenges and encourages them to make sustainable choices in their daily lives.

Incorporating cycling into the primary school curriculum reflects a commitment to holistic education, encompassing physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and environmental dimensions of well-being. By providing students with opportunities to cycle safely and confidently, the curriculum aims to empower them to lead healthy, active, and sustainable lives while fostering a sense of responsibility towards the planet.

A further point to note here is that Irish transport policy, investment plans and the mobility culture are all having to change quickly now in response to the need to rapidly decarbonise the transport sector. Therefore it important to equip school children with the skills to be able to use the transport infrastructure networks of the future – i.e. those ‘active travel’ routes which are being developed extensively countrywide as part of the National Cycle Network Plan, CycleConnects plans, BusConnects bus and cycle network plans and the metropolitan cycle network plans such as the Greater Dublin Area Cycle Network Plan. Training in being a competent bicycle user at a young age will help pupils to confidently navigate the multi-modal transport systems which will become increasingly common in Ireland (and indeed abroad) over the coming years. Becoming a competent cyclist is a skill for life in a rapidly changing world.    

Requested Amendment:

The Irish Cycling Campaign is recommending the following changes to the Table 9: Description of Physical Education activity areas contained within Section 6D: PE Activity Areas on pages 43 and 44 of the Draft Primary Wellbeing Specification to strengthen the place of cycling as both an enjoyable activity and a key travel mode for children in our primary school system.

  1. From the section labelled “Adventure” we recommend the removal of “Wheel based activities are also an important element of adventure activities incorporating a focus on the lifelong activity of cycling, alongside other wheel-based activities such as scooter and scooter board.”
  2. With this deletion we would recommend the inclusion of a new separate section titled “Cycling, Wheeling and Walking” to replace this reference to cycling.

Within this “Cycling, Wheeling and Walking” section we would suggest the following as the body of text to better support cycling within the curriculum:

Cycling empowers independence and connection in children allowing them the freedom and safety to travel to and from school in a method that both enables activity and climate responsibility. Direct teaching of cycling skills will enable them to travel in a safe and enjoyable fashion while learning to be considerate road users. 

Social cycling to school instils within children a habit of regular, daily activity within their lives. It creates a connection to their peers and their wider community further fostering active citizenship and acts as a base for a healthy and active lifestyle. 

Cycling, walking and wheeling also provide opportunities for children to be active outside directly taught PE classes and organised sports. Taken together these movement types instil a lifelong love of movement that includes children of all abilities.


Additional Observations:

  1. Teacher Training and Upskilling

Existing cycle training programs in schools tend to be outsourced to external cycle training providers. This poses challenges for many schools as they may not be in a position to provide funding for these training providers or book training providers due to timetabling issues or geographical location. 

We recommend that the Wellbeing curriculum encourages and expects class teachers to directly engage with teaching and learning related to cycling. We appreciate that there will be training needs in this area but feel that this may be achieved through the provision of Continuous Professional Development and EPV training courses and events. 

These training courses should intend to enable class teachers to ensure that the children in their class are able to:

  1. Develop the foundational skills in order to cycle safely between two points. 
  2. Carry out basic checks and tasks on a bike (move saddle height, check brakes, pump tyres).
  3. Understand the rules of the road.
  4. Develop an interest and curiosity in cycling. 

(b) Health benefits

HSE guidelines on physical activity in children say that children over 5 should have at least 1 hour of energetic play a day – ‘where they sweat and breath faster than normal’. Staying fit is imperative for a child’s growth and development to have a healthy body, develop self confidence and improve learning and attention (HSE, 2022). We argue this activity could be done on route to and from school where possible.  

Additionally, being overly car-dependent poses both direct and indirect risks to children. An Irish child’s outdoor environment is made physically more dangerous with increasing number and size of vehicles and their associated pollution. The indirect effects to health in taking sedentary transport to school is the opportunity cost of not walking, cycling or scooting to school. In effect, this is about more than teaching a child to cycle a bike; rather, it is about using it it as a transport tool and supporting this positive transition can improve baseline paediatric health and create lifelong healthy habits. According to the Department of Children in 2018, approximately 50% of children aged 10–17 reported being physically active for at least 60 minutes per day on more than four days per week, early intervention at primary school level can help develop these healthy habits.

Walking or cycling to where you are going will be good for a child and allow them to engineer physical activity into their daily lives by transport. An easy win. According to the Road Safety Authority figures show that 2 of 3 child casualties on our roads were child pedestrians or cyclists. Between 2014 and 2022 there were 56 fatalities aged 0-15 years and 852 seriously injured road users, representing 4% of total fatalities and 8% of total serious injuries. Although we believe the responsibility of reducing road danger lies with the adult driving the car, road safety awareness starts by being a pedestrian or cyclist.  Cycling is a core life skill, a building block to road safety to improve awareness, it should be part of the syllabus at primary level.

Cycling is inclusive, children with different physical and mental needs are capable of cycling a bike. This may not be the same for children during other activities. 

(c) SEN Children: Focus on Cycling and Autism

Children with autism are very often some of the most creative and detail oriented children within the classroom. They are keen observers and are incredibly resilient, accepting and honest. In addition to the huge positives children with autism bring to school and family life, they also have a number of common challenges which may include:

• Difficulty with social interaction.

• Delayed or limited communication skills.

• Sensory processing difficulties.

• Restrictive patterns of behaviour or interests.

• Delays and difficulties with motor skills development.

• Stereotypical behaviours.

• Concentration difficulties.

Some of the motor skills problems that children with Autism experience include difficulties with balance, postural stability, joint flexibility and movement speed. The secondary consequence of motor skills difficulties include avoidance of group activities including team sports and therefore decreased opportunity for physical activity and social interaction. We would firmly maintain that our cities and schools must provide support and facilities to allow all children to avail of the right amount of physical activity for optimum health and wellbeing.

Exercise of all kinds increases opportunities for social interaction and improves social motivation and communication for all children but especially for children with autism. It promotes calmness and relaxation while also having clear improvements in physical health. Physical stimulation obtained through body rocking, arm flapping and spinning can decrease with regular daily exercise. As with all school children, physical exertion helps children with autism to complete classroom tasks with increased accuracy. 

Motor Skills and FUNdamental Movement Skills

If we examine motor skills and fundamental movement skills we can very clearly focus on the benefits cycling in particular can bring to children with autism. With many of these children experiencing roadblocks in developing different aspects of their motor skills, the development of physical literacy is a key part of their schooling and life skills development. They may need more time and support to learn to cycle but once accomplished their sense of achievement is powerful. The therapeutic and emotional benefits gained are very worthwhile.

The Move Well, Move Often programme (PDST, 2017) has been rolled out in schools in recent years and has a far more skills and assessment focused take on physical literacy than previous physical education programmes. It has been adapted for use by many Special Education Needs (SEN) teachers in Irish primary schools over the past number of years for both individual and group teaching of fundamental movement skills. When looking at these skills it’s important to understand that while they may be given specific instruction during motor skills teaching with children with autism, all of these physical literacy skills are complementary and interconnected. While locomotion and manipulative skills may be easier to teach within a standard school PE hall setting, the stability skills benefit hugely from extra interventions such as cycling. 

For many children with autism regulation of sensory inputs can be a particular challenge. They may be overloaded by noisy, busy environments. Proprioceptive (body awareness) and vestibular (balance) sensory senses can often be challenging areas too. This can lead to a more limited ability to explore their environment and, in turn, less opportunity to develop their sensory systems, resilience and relationships with peers. Children with motor difficulties require activities that challenge these systems to help them to improve and develop. They need activities that challenge balance, coordination and motor planning such as cycling to help address these sensory issues. Activities such as these have a hugely calming influence on the sensory systems of children with autism. 

Social Skills Development

Social skills, difficulties with social interactions and making meaningful and lasting connections with peers is a key focus of a lot of school aged interventions. A huge aspect of the teaching of primary school aged children focuses on building and developing these skills. Children with autism have both discrete social skills teaching and social group teaching as part of their school-based interventions. Cycling to school with peers in a group or a cycle bus (a group of children cycling together in convoy to and from school under parental supervision) helps develop a sense of belonging and community with their peers that sits perfectly alongside this. The shared communal routines provide incredible benefits to their levels of social interaction, communication skills and most importantly their self-confidence. 

The importance of cycling to both children’s feelings of belonging and inclusion within a group and their mental health cannot be overstated. This is especially important as children reach adolescence where interests and behaviours develop. A shared way of moving together such as cycling gives children a sense of belonging and a common interest. It also ensures that the exercise they need to help self-regulate is an enjoyable and communal experience. Having the outlet for their feelings is an especially important part of guiding children with autism through this particular phase of their lives and having a solid peer group such as a cycling group strengthens this resilience.

We know that physical activity rates decrease from childhood to adolescence. Older individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) living in community settings have been observed to live very sedentary lifestyles. If children with ASD do not develop participation skills in active leisure time activities, they will most likely become increasingly sedentary with age placing them at risk of diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers. We must therefore strive to encourage physical activity for these children in our schools and communities.

Support children with autism to learn to cycle and provide the infrastructure to keep them cycling, and they will gain lifelong benefits for their physical and emotional wellbeing.  Of equal importance, they will have increased opportunities for meaningful daily social interactions.


Conclusion:

We wish to thank the NCCA and its staff for what is an excellent draft specification for the new Primary Wellbeing Curriculum. We hope that you find our observations helpful and that you will consider them for inclusion in the final draft of the curriculum. If we can be of any further help please do not hesitate to contact us at any stage.

Regards,

Neasa Ní Bheilbigh – Chairperson of the Irish Cycling Campaign, (Primary Teacher – Galway)

Dave Tobin – Vice-Chair of the Irish Cycling Campaign (Primary SET – Limerick)

Conn O’Donovan – Irish Cycling Campaign (Primary Teacher – Cork)

Vinnie Wall – Executive Member of the Irish Cycling Campaign (Paediatric Anesthesiologist – Cork)

Colm Ryder – Submissions Officer of the Irish Cycling Campaign 

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Note that a PDF version of this submission can be downloaded / read HERE.  

Limerick Greenway – Kerry Section

The Limerick Greenway, also known as the Great Southern Trail Greenway has been open now for a few years, and the route now extends to Listowel, Kerry, since October 2022.

A previous post, commemorates the long years of campaigning that it took to bring this project to fruition.

This is a more personal account of the Kerry Section only, from Abbeyfeale to Listowel, which we walked, there one day, back the next, rather than cycled.

Abbeyfeale is in Co. Limerick, and the first 3km of the route is officially the Limerick Greenway and rest, ~12km, is in Kerry. It seems slightly absurd that the Greenway is so divided, reminiscent of the roads around the border with Northern Ireland, although the differences are slight.

The route is generally very good quality, laid in tarmac, with gravel edges, for better drainage. Signage is also good quality (differing slightly between the Limerick & Kerry Sections, as mentioned), although a bit more of it e.g. local information (e.g. wildlife, farming, railway history), distance information etc. would be good to see. This section, at 15km, is the longest section on the entire Greenway, and although there are a sprinkling of seats along the way, there are few houses, no villages and definitely no water or refreshments.

One welcome feature, shown above, are the tool stations, two along this section. It’s clear that the actual tools will have a pretty short working life as they are already quite badly corroded. The pump seemed in good order.

Apparently, when the railway closed in the 1970s, although the Local Authorities had first refusal of ownership, they declined, seeing it as of little value at the time. This was, in retrospect, regrettable, as it made wresting use of the route back from landowners a long and fraught process.

Part of this dynamic is evidently the construction of the many crossing points, which are mostly agricultural; in some places, bridges were constructed, the route dipped to allow headroom, thereby breaking the level way established by the railway engineers, as seen above.

In other places there are gates, suggesting infrequent agricultural use; some gates featured smaller by-pass gates, that would allow Greenway Users to pass, with caution. This is preferable to the constant opening and closing of gates, experienced by both walkers and cyclists elsewhere. At the infrequent road crossings, all minor roads, there are dog-leg barriers, which don’t enforce dismount, but prevent careless passage.

In the cuttings there are few original bridges, as above. These stretches, mostly damp, feature the richest plant growth. The route could generally be called a “wildlife corridor”, presumably as the verges are free of the chemicals that have destroyed much of the flora in the countryside generally. This is apparently true of many transport corridors, although some may unfortunately still be sprayed.

One – completely unnecessary and preventable – confusion arises as to which side of the road to walk and ride; see Code of Conduct. This enjoins walkers to “Keep left and pass on right” without specifying what cyclists should do, although implicitly the same. In contrast – hence the confusion – the Highway Code Standard Practice is for pedestrians is walk on the right, to face oncoming traffic; this is particularly necessary for a Greenway, as bicycles, even electric ones, are very quiet, and not all remember to use a bell, or even have one.

We did this route over a weekend, and saw a fair few other users, almost all cyclists, but nowhere near as many as the better-known Mayo or Waterford Greenways. This seems a pity as the route is attractive, with pleasant towns along the way. It is evident that more promotion and more facilities will be needed to change this.

At the other end of the Greenway, which currently reaches Rathkeale, there are hopes of a extension into Limerick City; it is evident this will be both more valuable, particularly to locals, but also more difficult, as the space is correspondingly more contested.

Oireachtas All-Party Cycling Group Bike Week Cycle

We had a super turnout of supporters of cycling from the Dáil, Seanad and beyond at the annual Oireachtas spin.

It’s almost become a tradition now for Oireachtas members to ride around Dublin to celebrate Bike Week and the joys of cycling.

It’s a great way for us to catch up with Oireachtas members who appreciate how good cycling is for mental and physical health, how it offers real economic opportunities, and how it can help restore local and global environments.

(L to R) Senators Maria Sherlock and Gerard Horken, cycle organiser Ivana Bacik TD (Mike McKillen)

Ivana Bacik TD (Lab), Lynn Boylan TD (SF), Richard Bruton TD (FG), Patrick Costello (GP), Senator Roisin Garvey (GP), Senator Gerard Horken (FF), Senator Alice-Mary Higgins (Ind), Pauline O’Reilly TD (GP),  Darren O’Rourke (SF) Senator Marie Sherlock (Lab), were members who made time to bike and chat.

We were very grateful to Ivana and staff for gathering the All-Party group and organising the event, in cooperation with our hard-working Irish Cycling Campaign Vice-chair, Dave Tobin. Also a shout-out to Dublin Cycling Campaign members who came along.

‘Great to see Bike Week uniting the likes of Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, the Greens, Labour, Sinn Féin and others, and for once no-one competing for first place!’

– Dave Tobin

Top photo courtesy of Ivana’s office. More images, courtesy of Mike McKillen – https://www.flickr.com/photos/65436171@N00/albums/72177720316968403/

Will new road designs protect people at junctions?

Cyclists are at their most vulnerable at junctions — the location of one in four of all cycling fatalities. Can changes to traffic movements help make cycling safer?

In 2011 the Dublin Cycling Campaign highlighted what it considered to be the most dangerous junctions in Dublin. These were places where cyclists were left unprotected from vehicles and particularly vulnerable to collision with cars, buses or lorries …

Original article: Irish Times 11th May 2024

Related: Irish Cycle – What will it take for Ireland to protect cyclists at junctions?

Related: Dublin City Council – Protected Junctions

Measuring Active Travel with Telraam – Irish Cycling Campaign webinar

Irish Cycling Campaign recently hosted a special online session about measuring active travel, engaging your communities and influencing policymakers.

Our special guest speaker was Community Manager Robert McIntosh from Telraam, who provided an overview of what their devices do and how you can get started.

Irish Cycling Campaign’s Dave Anderson spoke about the experiences of his local group, Navan Cycling Initiative, in using Telraam, the supports offered and potential funding options.

The online webinar was recorded and is now available here to watch:


Irish Cycling Campaign wishes to thank Telraam’s Robert McIntosh for sharing his expertise and advice at this ICC webinar. 

For more info about Telraam, head to https://talks.telraam.net

Irish Cycling Campaign – Reflecting on our Campaigning in 2023

In this article, we look back on 2023 through the frame of our 2021-26 Strategy (with our six strategic aims shown below) and consider how much progress we have made. In particular, we highlight where Irish Cycling Campaign / our Local Groups are making a real impact on the mobility culture of Ireland.

Note, however, that this article only scrapes the surface of all of the incredible work conducted by our network of volunteers for which we are very grateful.


ICC’s overarching aims as per our current strategy, are:

  1. Develop a vibrant and resilient all-island cycling advocacy community
  2. Influence the national conversation on mobility and quality of life
  3. Seek to ensure public policy embraces cycling
  4. Advocate for more effective institutions and new legislation
  5. Seek to ensure there is ample funding spent on cycling
  6. Seek to secure high quality routes and infrastructure

We frame our 2023 highlighted achievements around these: 

  1. Community
    Underpinning effective advocacy work is having a resilient organisation, and we put significant work into this in 2023.

    We note here:
    – the adoption of our new Constitution (https://cyclist.ie/2024/01/irish-cycling-campaign-new-name-and-constitution-adopted/)
    – the development of our Operations Manual
    – the advancement of a “Theory of Change” (not yet published)
    – the hosting of a major “Gathering” of our members, aimed at ‘upping the morale’ of volunteers. This event also marked the 30th Birthday of local group Dublin Cycling Campaign, a significant milestone – https://cyclist.ie/2023/10/cyclist-ie-gathering-and-dcc-30th-birthday-weekend/.  

  2. National Conversation
    Throughout 2023, Irish Cycling Campaign was the ‘go-to’ NGO for the media for insights on cycling policy. We also helped to shape the conversation on wider (public) transport topics, and on links between public health outcomes and transport investment types. A summary of our 2023 media contributions can be read here while our contributions in the media in 2024 to date can be read here. Without these contributions, media discourses would be dominated by less informed and more car-centric perspectives. Our contributions soften the ground for a greater public acceptance for active travel investments.

    We also note the contributions ICC members made at the international “Cycling and Society” Research Conference – see https://cyclist.ie/2023/09/2023-cycling-society-conference-cyclist-ie-report/. These help to inform under- and post-grad thinking from an activist perspective.  

  3. Public Policy
    Throughout 2023, we advocated to the Departments of: Transport; Environment, Climate & Communications; Health; and Finance for cycling as a climate-friendly, healthy, congestion-free transport mode. 

Following submissions made in 2023, we were very happy to see the National Cycle Network Plan published in Jan 2024 –  https://cyclist.ie/2024/01/ncn-launch-in-sallins-irish-cycling-campaign-report/. In more concrete terms, we warmly welcomed the Shannon Cycle Bridge opening which we have long advocated for https://cyclist.ie/2023/08/cyclist-ie-celebrates-vital-athlone-link-bridge-opening/.

  1. Institutions and Legislation
    One of the most difficult domains ICC operates in is where we seek to change the culture of driving, and this brings us into close contact with the National Transport Authority (NTA), the Gardaí and the Road Safety Authority in particular.

    A major milestone for cycling campaigners in 2023 was getting the new National Cycle Manual published (https://www.nationaltransport.ie/publications/cycle-design-manual/). ICC provided detailed technical feedback on earlier iterations, and this helped to shape the final version of the manual. Additionally, many ICC members took part in the Engineers Ireland training webinars on it – https://www.nationaltransport.ie/publications/introduction-to-the-cycle-design-manual-webinar-series/ – which helps to inform our community and shape the minds of others working in this domain.

    Amongst the topics raised with An Garda Síochána were collision reporting, the portal for video evidence, and wider enforcement issues through our meetings with the A/Commissioner for Community & Roads Policing, Paula Hilman, and her team. We are now building on these conversations so as to put a greater emphasis on reducing road danger from driver behaviour, vehicle speeds, and ever increasing vehicle sizes. 

  2. Funding
    As noted above, we continue our work to normalise the idea that at least 20% of the transport capital budget is spent on active travel. Our Pre-Budget Submission (delivered in August 2023) re-emphasised this argument – https://cyclist.ie/2023/08/cyclist-ie-pre-budget-2024-submission/. Additionally, our active engagement with the European Cyclists’ Federation supported its work in securing the adoption of the first EU level inter-institutional cycling policy – https://ecf.com/news-and-events/news/historic-milestone-cycling-european-institutions-officially-adopt-joint

  3. Quality Infrastructure
    Of the submissions made in 2023, we note the quality of those made to An Bord Pleanála in regard to the 12 BusConnects ‘Core Bus Corridor’ planning applications. See https://www.dublincycling.com/cycling/bus-connects-kimmage-city-centre-scheme. Four of the 12 schemes have now been approved by ABP (https://busconnects.ie/cities/dublin/core-bus-corridors/).

    We also highlight the quality of the submissions on Metrolink in early 2023 (https://www.dublincycling.com/cycling/dublin-cycling-campaign-asks-two-changes-metrolink-project), which were followed by presentations at the Oral Hearing in early 2024 – all focused on intermodal journeys as reported by the Irish Times

Bike Week 2024 – Irish Cycling Campaign

Irish Cycling Campaign is delighted to see so many of our Local Groups organising events for Bike Week 2024 in every corner of the country. In this article, we list some of the main events that groups are running – while noting that it is not exhaustive!

You can read about further events on the official Bike Week site here: https://www.transportforireland.ie/getting-around/by-bicycle/bikeweek/

We encourage everyone to support our events – and also to join Irish Cycling Campaign if you are not already a member https://cyclist.ie/join/
Thank you!  

The Wheels of Athenry / Co.Galway 

Athenry CycleFest 2024

Saturday, 11th May, 1 – 4pm

Athenry Town Park

Athenry CycleFest 2024 will be kicking off #BikeWeek in County Galway on Saturday the 11th of May from 1 – 4pm in the Town Park!

Wheel on down to Athenry CycleFest for a *FREE* and jam packed afternoon of Cycling, Community, and Craic in the Town Park.

The afternoon’s grand finale is the ATHENRY PEDAL PARADE at 3pm starting at the Town Park. 

The full programme can be found HERE.

A huge welcome awaits for folk near and far!

For a taster of what to expect check out our promo vid HERE.

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CLONAKILTY BICYCLE FESTIVAL, CO CORK

All info at www.clonakiltybicyclefestival.org

FRIDAY 17TH MAY 2024 7pm Opening night: Lap of the town, blessing of the bicycles & film night opening night at DeBarras Folk Club (upstairs)

SATURDAY 18TH MAY 2024 10am Chakra Dance Cycle – leave at 10am – cycle to Ring to loosen up those Chakra’s through dance – co hosted with Ciara Holland – free, please book, text 085 874 5891 or [email protected]

SATURDAY 18TH MAY 2024  3pm – ‘Kidical Mass’ Cycle meet at Emmet Square – Another addition of our most popular event for kids.  Bring your bike to Emmet Square for an all ages lap around Clonakilty

SATURDAY 18TH MAY 2024  7pm – Sunset Bird Watch Cycle (10km) meet at Emmet Square – cycle from Clonakilty town to the Inchydoney estuary identifying local birds species.  In collaboration with Bird Watch Ireland Free

SUNDAY 19TH MAY 2024  10.30am Stop, Look, Listen cycle – meet at Emmet Square – cycle a lap of the town to the biodiversity garden at Bennetts Field, and listen to 3 pieces of music on the theme of nature and biodiversity.

SUNDAY 19TH MAY 2024   3pm – River cycle in collaboration with Clochán Uisce (our local rivers group) – meet at Emmet Square to explore the biodiversity in our local rivers and check its health including kick sampling and water testing as part of the EU drinkable rivers program. Family friendly.

SUNDAY 19TH MAY 2024  5.30pm ‘Waste not, want not’ Curry Cycle!  a 5 km cycle around Clonakilty to arrive at our secret location for a ‘Waste Not Want Not’ Curry prepared by chef Gillian Hegarty (followed directly by end of fest Bikeoke Party).  BYO tupperware and take home any leftovers. Registration essential 30 max – free dinner with prebooking! Free, please book, text 085 874 5891 or [email protected]

SUNDAY 19TH MAY 2024   7pm End of festival Bikeoke party – O’Donovans Alley Garden (no need to book) – can anyone top Thady’s performance of Tequilla from last year?

Clonakilty Bike Circus

Christmas Tree Yard
at Spiller’s Lane
Bike Week Calendar of Events
May 11 thru May 19, 2024

All Week

Free Bicycle Safety Checks
Come learn about the Bike Circus and what it means to be a member. Have your bike safety checked for free. Meet the Yard Dogz, our friendly crew of volunteers.

The Pushbike’s Companion
Want to be your bike’s best friend? Come learn about free bike maintenance and repair courses available at the Bike Circus. 

Saturday 11/05 @ 11:00 Hrs

Pre-Flight Your Children’s Bikes for Safety
Safety Maintenance.  Introduction to Vee Brakes. Brief instruction, then greasy hands play time for all participants.

Saturday 11/05 @ Noon

Group Cycle  – Family Adventure
We open Bike Week with a family-friendly picnic ramble along Clonakilty Bay, a migratory wildfowl sanctuary.   Suitable for all cyclists.  Seniors are invited to  join us aboard The Silver Bullet, Clon’s free trishaw.

Monday, 13/05 @  Noon
Eldercycle – Keep on Bikin’
Over 60 and want to return to cycling? Our resident octogenarian cyclist presents this program just for you. Explore the options for those who still hear the wild goose call.

Monday, 13/05 @ 14:00 Hrs.
Wind in Your Hair
Assistive Cycling:  Electric and specially constructed  tandems, bikes, & trikes to make cycling available for all. Silver Bullet spins around Clon all day. 

Tuesday, 14/05 @ 14:00 Hrs.
‘Thar Be Dragons!’ Ebikes For the Uninitiated. 
Ebikes have taken the world, the market is awash in choices.  Why are some so dear, others selling as Internet bargains? This is a chance to learn about eBikes free of sales pressure. There will be bikes to examine and discuss. We’ll tell all. 

Dogg Oscar Frame  Building

What is The Bike Circus?

The Bike Circus is voluntary organization, a tool-share devoted to everyday cycling.  We offer free training in bike maintenance & repair and a formal apprenticeship for those who want to dig a little deeper.  We fix bikes. We help people fix their own bikes.  We build custom bikes for special cyclists.  The Circus is open to all and promotes inclusion without regard to age, gender, or physical limitation.  We are entirely voluntary and private, receiving no regular funding from any agency or government.  All our personnel, ‘The Yard Dogz,’  are volunteers.

We are a spin-off of the Clonakilty Bike Festival and sponsored by Clonakilty Blackpudding. They have assisted us since the outset.  We thank them for their contribution.

Come visit us. You’re very welcome.
Keep on Bikin’!

Dublin Cycling Campaign events

Multiple events over Bike Week
Details at https://www.dublincycling.com/cycling/bike-week-2024 

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Cork Cycling Campaign

All info also available on: https://corkcyclingcampaign.com/events/

Saturday May 11th, 10.00 – Coffee by Bike (starting in town, various coffee shops) 

Come with us on a tour of the city’s best independent coffee spots by bike, discover new routes and sample new blends in this easy going social cycle.

Gathering point – Michael Collins

Wednesday May 15th, 13.00 – 14.30 – Douglas Street / Business Event – Bike Douglas Street 

An event for businesses of Cork to discuss making their businesses and the city friendlier to cycling.

We will have bikes on hand for a guided cycle of the area as well as a sampling of treats from local businesses.

Gathering point – Parklet Douglas Street.

Wednesday May 15th, 14.30 – 16.30 – Cork through the Spokes 

In association with Cork Folklore Project.
Come to share your Oral History of Cycling in Cork in the past.
Do you remember the bike delivery boys, do you have a story about cycling down Patrick’s Hill?
We’d love to hear about that and anything else, come join us for a chat.
Location – North Cathedral Visitor Centre

Saturday May 18th, 14.00 – 15.00 – Kids Event (Fitzgerald’s Park) – Super Cycle on the Lee  
Come dressed as your favourite superhero and cycle a safe path on the riverside along with the best super tunes.
Gathering point – Fitzgerald’s Park Cafe

Sunday May 19th – Open for Cycling (Various Start points into City Centre) 
We lead cycles from key points of the city into the city centre which is Open for Cycling on this day.
Gathering points – Various leading to Patrick Street

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DLR Bike Week: 

https://www.dlrcoco.ie/bikeweek2024

All the dates and details are on this link.

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Drogheda Cycling / County Louth

Cycle Sense / Skibbereen, County Cork

Here are details of 2 of our Bike Week events 

Leitrim Cycling Festival 

Leitrim Cycling Festival is a free, family-friendly festival held during Bike Week and will be hosted in Keshcarrigan from May 17-19.

Each year, the festival moves to a different town or village and is organised by a small group of volunteers in collaboration with each local community. 

The festival aims to celebrate cycling, communities and the beautiful county of Leitrim in Ireland’s hidden heartlands. Keshcarrigan is a small village in south Leitrim nestled between the hills of Sheebeg, the Ballinamore canal and the lakes of Keshcarrigan and Lough Scur.

This year’s programme includes many of the annual festival highlights including the community cycle and picnic, the launch lap, music, art workshops and of course the much-loved slow bicycle race. 

In addition, you will find many events unique to Keshcarrigan, such as the free boat tours of Lough Scur thanks to the Shannon Queen, Astrokids play time, a workshop with local author Maria Hoey, a heritage cycle and treasure hunt, and the Kiltubrid Pipe Band leading the launch lap.

This year’s festival is also during National Biodiversity Week, and thanks to funding from the Irish Environmental Network, the programme includes an event celebrating the cultural and social value of the hawthorn tree with the Leitrim Hawthorn Project.

To see the full programme check out www.leitrimcyclingfestival.com 

Kerry Cycling Campaign

Nature Cycle: Tralee to Fenit Greenway

18/05/2024    

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Come on a nature cycle along the Tralee to Fenit Greenway and meet some of the wild plants and habitats along the way.

Tar linn ar rothaíocht dhúlra ar Bhealach Glas Thrálí – Fhianait, ag buaileadh leis na plandaí ages ghnáthog fhiáin ar an slí.

Meeting Point: Greenway entrance – Opposite Tralee Train Station

Gorey, Co. Wexford. Gorey Pedestrian and Cycling Association & Wexford County Council

A fun morning with bike themed events in Gorey Town Park, including a short Family Slow Roll in Gorey town in association with Gorey Pedestrian and Cycle Association.  Slow bike race; prizes for best dressed bike; face painting ,bike themed prizes. Balance Bike Buddies will also be on hand to teach some basic cycling skills to younger children. 

Time:  11am to 1pm 

Date: Saturday, the 18th of May 

Location: Gorey Town Park and local streets of Gorey, Co. Wexford

Suitability: All.  Competent cyclists only on the Slow Roll as this takes place on the public streets.  Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times

For more information email [email protected] 

BIODIVERSITY BIKE RIDE WITH GOREY PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLING ASSOCIATION

Join biodiversity expert Natasha Ariff and the Gorey Pedestrian and Cycling for a biodiversity bike ride and learn how we can protect nature in Gorey. The route will stop by several biodiversity sites in Gorey town where we will learn what we have around us, and how we can do so much more to protect our environment in Gorey.  Followed by complimentary refreshments at Gorey Town Park

Time:  11:00pm – 1:00pm

Date: Sunday the 19th of May

Location: Meet at the Heritage Orchard (Next to the Fire Station in Gorey)

Suitability: All fitness levels.  Everyone joining must have a roadworthy bicycle, a helmet, hi viz.  Limited spaces 

For more information:  To book your place get your ticket on: biobike.eventbrite.com

https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/biodiversity-bike-ride-gorey

Irish Cycling Campaign at ECF AGM 2024 – Report

Irish Cycling Campaign (formerly Cyclist.ie) has been an active member of the European Cyclists’ Federation for many years – and really first going back to the mid-1990s when Dublin Cycling Campaign was the initial contact point with ECF before our own national body was formed. For the last 15 years (plus), we have attended the ECF AGM, and this year Damien Ó Tuama flew the ICC flag at the gathering. In this article, he shares some reflections on what was a fruitful and enjoyable trip. 

Back in Zagreb
It was great to be back in Zagreb, a city I first visited back in 2008 when on a camper-van adventure with a good friend and with two old single speed foldable bikes on board. Zagreb is a friendly city, and it’s an easy place to move about in on their distinctive blue trams and on foot. It’s also easy enough to bike around the city and I elaborate on this below. I was delighted to be in the Croatian capital again and this time reconnecting with my ECF colleagues, including those I worked with closely during my time on the ECF Board from 2016-2021.

The Formal AGM
The ECF AGM was held in the quite beautiful “Journalist Building” which is close enough to the centre of the city. The building was funded by the Croatian Journalists’ Association, one of the oldest professional associations in Croatia (established in 1910), and it is still owned by it. It’s the meeting point for Croatian journalists and media workers, but also a venue for different cultural, literary, scientific and artistic events. It was a perfect size for our posse of around 60 participants, with a lovely view from the curved balcony as shown here. 

The formal part of the AGM took place over two days – a full day’s business on the Friday and a further half day of debate and discussions on the Saturday morning.

ECF AGM delegates plus ECF staff – Photo kindly provided by ECF

The CEO of ECF is Jill Warren (@JillWarrenECF), and she has been at the helm of the organisation since 2020. Jill gave a great overview of what has been another effective year of advocacy work for ECF. Probably the highlight of the last year came in the last few months when the European Council, Commission and Parliament signed the European Declaration on Cycling, marking the official adoption of the first inter-institutional cycling policy at the European level. Amongst other benefits, this Declaration can be referred to by national organisations all around Europe as it shows the direction that transport policy needs to take over the coming years. Another work area that Jill highlighted were the significant lobbying efforts made to reshape the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive which now sets, for the very first time, European minimum bicycle parking norms for virtually all types of buildings, both residential as well as non-residential – see here. Huge credit is due to all of the staff here, but particularly Fabian Küster who has been working on this topic for well over 5 years.   

Overall, ECF is in good shape, with a wide portfolio of funding sources underpinning its day-to-day functioning and enabling it to employ 20+ super committed and knowledgeable staff members.


Some of Jill’s highlights of ECF’s work in 2023-2024 

Elections for the board took place on Day #2 after the candidates had introduced themselves on Day #1. There was a very healthy interest in the process with a total of 16 candidates applying in February for four available board positions. I was part of a three person Nominations Committee, along with (current board member) Camille Thomé and (former board member) Raluca Fiser, that had the job of encouraging potential candidates to apply, analysing applications, interviewing candidates and producing a short-list of recommended candidates for the election itself – not an easy job with so many good applicants vying to be on the ECF Board! 


Electronic voting underway in the ECF Board Elections

In the end, Henk Swarttouw (@copenhenken) from The Netherlands was re-elected as President of the Board (the only applicant for this position), with Sidsel Burk Hjuler (Denmark) and Graham Waston (UK) both re-elected for a second three year term, and with the final vacant position going to Siliva Casorran from Barcelona. They join the four existing board members Francesco Baroncini (Italy), Camille Thomé (France), Jan Vermeulen (Belgium) and Angela Francke (Germany). All in all, it’s a strong board with a decent gender mix and a reasonably good geographical representation, although it is missing someone from the eastern part of the Continent.


L-R: Tena Šarić Rukavina and Ema Tarabochia Veršić from Sindkat Biciklista

There was plenty of good debates at the AGM, particularly in regard to the mid-term review of the ECF Strategy and in response to the panel discussion on “How to make cycling an election issue?” In that session, ECF moderated a discussion with members on the strategies, tactics and messages needed to make cycling a relevant issue during election season, and how election campaigns focused on cycling can reach political incumbents and candidates from across the political spectrum. It was nicely moderated by Philip Amaral (@AmaralPhilip), ECF’s Director of Policy and Development, who is also ECF’s contact point for the European elections. These discussions will feed into Irish Cycling Campaign’s own plans ahead of the Local and European elections – see https://cyclist.ie/2024/04/asks-for-local-elections-candidates/.  


Philip Amaral, ECF’s Director of Policy and Development

Some conclusions from the Croatian cycle campaigners on how to make cycling an election issue


Jens Peter Hansen (Danish Cyclists’ Federation) spoke on his work of quantifying motor vehicles’ close passing of him on Danish roads. 

Getting About in Zagreb / Cycling Trips
All of the AGM delegates has access to Zagreb’s Nextbike bike sharing scheme for the duration of the AGM and over the weekend, but I also took the tram quite a bit as it was super easy and convenient. Just 53c for a ticket if bought in advance (or 80c if bought from the tram driver). The trams themselves span a mixture of older ones going back to the 1950s (the ones common to much of Eastern and Central European cities – as shown below) to much bigger and slicker brand new ones (shown further below).

Hats off to local ECF Member group and the AGM hosts, Sindikat Biciklista (@cyklofil), for organising a really entertaining and informative city bike ride for all of the ECF participants! We started and finished at the Croatian National Theatre and got a great insight into the city’s history and culture – and its topography!


Shared running of trams and bikes in the centre of Zagreb


ECF on tour in the old town!


Janko and Zvoni from Sindikat Biciclista, the Croatian Cycling Campaign

A sculpture by Ivan Meštrović showing Nikola Tesla, one of the most famous sons of Croatia (or of the Austrian Empire as it was then) 

Sindikat Biciklista also organised a special cycle trip on the Sunday morning, where we explored the southern part of the city including the extensive sports campus in which cars are being systematically removed so as to reduce road dangers and encourage more walking and cycling. 


The Sunday morning cycle crew. Back row, L-R: Stefan (Montenegro), Hugo (Switzerland), Damien (Ireland), Sladjana (Montenegro / Norway), Blazo (Montenegro), Igor (Bosnia & Herzegovina), Dejan (Montenegro), Dragan (Bosnia & Herzegovina); Front row, L-R: Silvia (Spain), Marko (Serbia), Robert (Croatia) – Photo kindly provided by Dragan!


One of Zagreb’s self-service egg vending machines

In terms of the quality of the cycling infrastructure in the city, it’s fair to say that it’s a real mixed bag. There are many cycle tracks positioned directly alongside footpaths on the main avenues, and people on bikes lose priority on a regular basis at side roads. There are also plenty of examples of ridiculously narrow cycle lanes – narrower than the width of one’s shoulders – which are squeezed in by removing space for pedestrians, while the main carriageways remain dominated by often multi-lane fast moving cars (as shown below). That said there are plenty of quieter streets where cycling is the perfect way to get about – particularly in the old town. 


Both parked and fast moving cars dominate much of Zagreb’s public space – with super narrow cycle tracks squeezed in here and there

Social Events
As important for catching up properly with colleagues from other ECF member groups are the social events organised as part of the AGM. We were very impressed to have the official ECF AGM 2024 dinner taking place at Dverce Palace, at the invitation of the City of Zagreb, with a welcome address by Mayor Mr. Tomislav Tomašević (shown below). 

L-R: Jill Warren (ECF CEO), Henk Swarttouw (ECF President), Mr. Tomislav Tomašević (Major of Zagreb), Janko Večerina (President of Sindikat Biciclista, the Croatian Cycling Campaign) and the staff of the Mayor 

The rest of the ECF AGM delegates!

And following the grandeur of the Mayor’s palace, we meandered down a narrow lane and slipped into a slightly hidden and much more informal jazz bar with a fine beer garden out the back for further catch-ups with colleagues.    

In Summary
As always, when meeting up with the ECF gang, it’s a lovely friendly affair. One is reconnecting with friends and colleagues, all of whom are campaigning hard in their own countries – and/or at an European level – to improve conditions for cycling and to make places more liveable. I’m particularly grateful to the hosts from Sindikat Biciklista (pictured below), who ran a brilliantly organised and most enjoyable AGM. They brought us to some fine formal venues, but also some very decent bars for music and chat – it’s so good to have that expert local knowledge guiding us in the host city! Hats off to Janko and his team for a fine job.

Personally, it was also great spending time with cycling campaigners from the Balkans – not only from Croatia, but also from Bosnia & Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia and Slovenia (with their new e-biking organisation) — and getting a sense of how they are campaigning in their cities and towns. My most memorable conversations though were with the cycling advocates from TUBIDEF in Turkey. Of their group, Serafettin is from the city of Antakya, which was pretty much completely flattened in the earthquake of early 2023 – see here – including his entire district and apartment buildings which he showed me in recently captured videos of his area. It was quite unfathomable how obliterated his city was, and the massive death toll experienced there. My heart goes out to him and his people as they embark on a long journey of dealing with so much grief and rebuilding the city.

As always, it was a rich and enjoyable experience attending the ECF AGM and spending time with other campaigners who are properly clued into what is happening in their local and national political contexts, and who enjoy a chat and a beer. The next AGM of ECF will take place in Brussels in 2025 and, all going well, we will have a mini-delegation from Irish Cycling Campaign attending, including some new faces on our side.  

See also:
https://ecf.com/news-and-events/news/ecf-annual-general-meeting-2024-europe%E2%80%99s-cycling-advocates-come-together-zagreb

Our ‘Ban Car Ads’ Initiative Moves Forward

The Irish Cycling Campaign’s initiative to prohibit or reduce fossil fuel advertising has moved forward a significant step with today’s Earth Day promotion by Paul Murphy TD of his Bill.

Deputy Murphy’s Bill was initially published last month. It seeks to prohibit the advertising of any fossil fuels, and any land vehicle or aircraft using fossil fuel. The way our transport system is skewed towards the use of cars, the dominance of our roads by car use, and the huge health detriments of our sedentary lifestyle and chronic car dependence are all worsened by advertising.

To quote Deputy Murphy, ‘Once you start to notice it, it is striking just how much car advertising there is: how many advertisements you see on TV are for cars; how many billboards are for car advertisements; and how much sponsorship of popular TV programmes, such as “The Late Late Show”, is from car manufacturers. There is evidence this has a direct link to the lack of media coverage of climate change, a topic, for example, that “The Late Late Show” has barely covered in all its years of showcasing shiny new cars. Last year in Ireland the number of new fossil-fuelled cars increased by 10% to more than 99,000’.

So some restriction on the ability of the motor industry to spend tens of millions in the Irish market would bring huge benefits to society. Action is long overdue.

The Bill’s already passed the first stage in the Oireachtas and received significant news coverage, such as the following:

  1. Newstalk article gives an overview — https://www.newstalk.com/news/time-for-tobacco-style-ban-on-fossil-fuel-car-advertisements-pbp-1651055 
  2. RTÉ interview about it (17 mins) – https://www.rte.ie/radio/radio1/clips/22366061/ 
  3. Public poll in Journal.ie (Bill wasn’t very popular!): https://www.thejournal.ie/should-there-be-a-ban-on-fossil-fuel-advertising-6320804-Mar2024/ 

Attending the press release at Buswells Hotel today was (centre of photograph) the Campaign’s Board Member Mary Sinnott, who worked to bring the issue to the attention of Deputy Murphy and team, filmmaker and activist Peadar King and Dr. Seán Owens, whose campaigning work focusses on the devastating effects of climate change on public health. Deputy Bríd Smith is on the far left, beside Deputy Murphy.

We understand that Sinn Féin also have a Bill, promoted by Senator Lynn Boylan aimed at restricting fossil fuel lobbying and (as an apolitical advocacy group) the Campaign will be glad to work with any body seeking to improve our transport choices, improve road safety, reduce air and noise pollution, and of course to limit climate change.

Reflecting on the Bill, Mary told the press conference,

‘Irish road transportation contributes 94% of transport-related greenhouse gases.Restricting fossil fuel product advertising will rebalance consumer choice towards sustainable modes of transport. It will reflect our national commitment to reduce our CO2 emissions by 2030, and to phase them out by 2050. Those committments we are already behind on.’

Mary quoted the poem “Begin” by Brendan Kenneally:

Though we live in a world that dreams of ending
that always seems about to give in
something that will not acknowledge conclusion
insists that we forever begin

Biodiversity Week Cycles

National Biodiversity Week 2024 runs over 10 days from Fri 17 to Sunday 26 May. It is organised by the Irish Environmental Network (IEN), with funding provided to them by the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS). 

The week is all about connecting people with nature and communicating the importance of biodiversity and the need to protect it. It’s also about entertainment and socialising though, and Irish Cycling Campaign is busy planning ‘Bikes and Biodiversity’ events in many parts of the country through our local groups. We acknowledge here the kind support of IEN (which we became a member of in late 2023) in enabling us to run these events.    

You can see the full list of events here:

Local Group leading the EventBikes & Biodiversity EventWebsite / Webpage with more info on the event
Clonakilty Bicycle FestivalClonakilty Bicycle Festival hosted River Cycle in collaboration with Clochán Uisce (local rivers group), a cycle to explore the biodiversity in our local riversand check its health including kick sampling and water testing as part of the EU drinkable rivers program, Family friendly. Sunday 19th May at 3pm.https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/feagle-river-cycle-in-collaboration-with-clochan-uisce-and-birdwatch-ireland/
Clonakilty Bicycle FestivalClonakilty Bicycle Festival hosted Bird Watch estuary Sunset cycle cycle from clinical town to the Inchydoney estuary identifying local bird species, run in collaboration with Bird Watch Ireland. Sat 18th May (time TBC – tidal related).https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/bird-watch-estuary-sunset-cycle/
Clonakilty Bicycle FestivalClonakilty Bicycle Festival hosted Stop, Look, Listen Biodiversity cycle. Cycle a lap of the town to the biodiversity garden at Bennetts Field, and listen to three pieces of music on the theme of nature and biodiversity. Sunday 19th May, 10.30am.https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/stop-look-listen-cycle/
Cloughjordan CyclingCloughjordan Cycling hosted `NatureCycles` – a guided looped cycle to natural heritage locations in the wider Cloughjordan area where the guide will inform about each locations nature value. The cycle will include a visit to a small family run organic farm to learn more about their diverse agri-ecosystem. Sunday 19th May.Details to be added to https://biodiversityweek.ie/events-calendar/ soon
Cork Cycling CampaignCork Cycling Campaign hosted ‘Bike-o-diversity Celebrates Biodiversity’ cycle tour of Cork City. Sun 26 May.https://corkcyclingcampaign.com/events/
https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/bike-o-diversity-meets-biodiversity-at-tramore-valley-park/
Dublin Cycling CampaignDublin Cycling Campaign hosted Dublin Community Garden Cycle with a Biodiversity theme. Sat 18 May.https://www.dublincycling.com/events/community-gardens-cycle-0

https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/dublin-cycling-campaign-community-gardens-cycle/
Gorey Pedestrian and Cycling AssociationGorey Pedestrian & Cycling Association hosted Biodiversity Bike Ride. “Instead of Nature walks, come for a Nature cycle (or ride). The cycle route will stop by several biodiversity areas in Gorey. Learn what we have and how we can do so much more to protect the nature in Gorey.https://www.eventbrite.com/e/biodiversity-bike-ride-tickets-876731877647?aff=oddtdtcreator
Kerry Cycling CampaignKerry Cycling Campaign hosted Nature Cycle along the Tralee to Fenit Greenway and meet some of the wild plants and habitats along the way. Tar linn arrothaíocht dhúlra ar Bhealach Glas Thrálí – Fhianait, ag buaileadh leis na plandaí ages ghnáthog fhiáin ar an slí. Led by Niamh Ní Dhúill (Natural Wild Gardens) and Cathy Eastman.https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/nature-cycle-tralee-to-fenit-greenway/
Leitrim Cycling FestivalHosted by Leitrim Cycling Festival with the Leitrim Hawthorn Project. As part of the Leitrim Cycling Festival (this year in Keshcarrigan), the event will celebrate the natural and cultural heritage of the Hawthorn tree through music, dance, storytelling and sharing the folklore and medicinal properties of the tree and discovering its key role in supporting biodiversity. Facilitated by Tara Boath Mooney, artist, singer, facilitator who has helped lead the community heritage project and its research into the Hawthorn traditions throughout Leitrim.https://leitrimcyclingfestival.com/leitrim-hawthorn-project/
Naas Cycling CampaignNaas Cycling Campaign / Naas Biodiversity Group hosted event. Explore nature-friendly projects completed by the Naas Biodiversity Group in recent years. For example, our Pocket Forests, rainwater planters, plus hedgerows that have been newly planted or rejuvenated through hedge laying. Meet like-minded people and learn practical tips to protect nature in your local area! The event is children-friendly (and for people who are not super confident cycling!), as we’ll be cycling slowly and over a relatively short route.

When: Friday 17th May at 7-9pm

Where: Meeting at the Naas Lakes, Naas, Co. Kildare. We will cycle together to K Leisure, stopping along the way to discuss different projects.

No registration necessary, just turn up on the way! If you need a bike or have any questions, contact the Naas Biodiversity Group on [email protected] or 0894147367.
https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/naas-biodiversity-bike-ride/
Sligo Cycling CampaignSligo Cycling Campaign hosted ‘After work Biodiversity Cycle to Strandhill and Culleenamore Sand Dunes’ to study Coastal Biodiversity Picnic with supper included as participants will miss an evening meal at home. Guided by an Ecologist from Woodrow. Thu 23rd May 2024, 5.30pm to 9pm.https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/coastal-biodiversity-cycle-to-strandhill/
WexBUGWexford Bicycle User Group hosted Biodiversity Cycle to Wexford Wildfowl Reserve / Wexford Slobs with a guide from NPWS / Wexford Naturalist Field Club.https://biodiversityweek.ie/events/biodiversity-cycle-to-wexford-wildfowl-reserve/

See https://biodiversityweek.ie/events-calendar/ for the full list of Biodiversity Week events as being collated by Irish Environmental Network.

Formerly Cyclist.ie