Category Archives: International Posts

Outside EU / UK / US

UNDER-REPORTING OF CYCLIST COLLISIONS – RESEARCH BY KEVIN GILDEA (TCD)

In this article, PhD researcher Kevin Gildea from Trinity College Dublin describes some recent findings from his RSA funded research project related to cyclist safety in Ireland. Cyclist.ie wishes to sincerely thank Kevin for taking the time to pen this article for us.

Kevin’s full paper, entitled “Characteristics of cyclist collisions in Ireland: Analysis of a self-reported survey”, has been published in the journal Accident Analysis & Prevention and can be found via this link.

The broad aims of our project are 1) to characterise cyclist collision risks in Ireland, and 2) to determine engineering-based prevention strategies. This project forms part of a broader strategy to improve cyclist safety in Ireland, and to attract more people to start using their bicycles.

Under-reporting in Ireland

Since embarking on this project I have heard numerous stories from people involved in collisions while cycling, noting that many of these are unlikely to have come to the attention of the Gardaí. I then investigated other work that Irish researchers have done in this area, specifically, from our colleagues Jack Short and Brian Caulfield in the Civil Engineering Department in Trinity College Dublin, who showed that cyclist collisions are the least likely collision type to be reported to the Gardaí. These unseen cases likely held some important cyclist safety insights, however, there was not any database that contained information for these collisions. All we had was anecdotal information from conversations with cyclists. We had to put some manners on this, so, in 2018 we designed and distributed a survey nationally across the Republic of Ireland.

Firstly, the study highlights a large amount of underreporting for cyclist collisions in Ireland – roughly ¾ of respondents involved in injurious collisions did not report the incident to the Gardaí. Furthermore the findings indicate that many minor injuries do not appear in hospital data. This is important since road safety priorities in Ireland are based on analysis of Garda data or hospital data, though primarily using Garda data. So, a major challenge with understanding the overall burden of cyclist collisions in Ireland relates to a substantial proportion of missing data. This is not a problem specific to Ireland – very few countries have the mechanisms in place to capture information on these under reported collisions.

How can data collection be improved?

This is a tricky issue. Some countries systematically link their Police and hospital data (e.g. Sweden). Our study indicates that combined monitoring of Garda and hospital data may be effective for monitoring Serious injury collisions, however, they would not effectively capture Minor injury collisions. Our results indicate that roughly 80% of Minor injuries would not be tracked. For these we must make it easier for road users to self-report their collisions, possibly via an online platform. For example, in the Metropolitan Police in London have an online platform for reporting collisions (https://www.met.police.uk/). Another option would be to include a module on road traffic collisions in the Irish National Travel Survey.

Reporting Biases

We also investigated the factors that have effect on whether or not cyclist collisions are reported to the Gardaí. Our main findings here is that injury severity, and collision type have an effect. Collisions involving motorised vehicles were more likely to be reported to the Gardaí – this is evident from analyses of Garda reported data in which the majority (over 90%) involve vehicles. The results highlighted the relative importance of single cyclist collisions in particular, which comprised roughly 30% of the cases, but were much less likely to be reported to the Gardaí. Specifically, the odds of Garda reporting was 20 times greater for greater for collisions with motorised vehicles. Furthermore, Minor injuries were much less likely to be reported to the police than Serious injuries. Specifically, the odds of Garda reporting was 7 times greater for Serious injuries.

What are the implications?

The implications are that road safety priorities are biased towards collisions with vehicles, and more severe collisions. International studies have shown that priorities do begin to change with the inclusion of lower severity collisions. Basically, if we had had access to these unreported collisions our road safety priorities would look different.

What can we do to address these?

We are working on this. We are currently performing a further analysis of the details of cyclist to motorised vehicle collisions and single cyclist collisions, with the inclusion of unreported collision types. Pre-crash scenarios and impact configurations for cyclist collisions with bonnet-type vehicles, and collision factors and fall types for single cyclist collisions are being coded. This analysis will provide an evidence base for road safety stakeholders, and (hopefully) lead to improvements in cycling safety in Ireland.

You can contact Kevin at:
https://twitter.com/kgildeatcd

VELO-CITY COMES TO DUBLIN

Dublin City Council is hosting the Velo-City 2019 international cycling conference in Dublin from the 25th – 28th June 2019 in the Convention Centre Dublin. The Velo-City conference is the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) annual global cycling summit, and Dublin is proud to be hosing the conference this year. It is the world’s largest conference dedicated to cycling, cycling infrastructure, bicycle innovations, bicycle safety, and the social and cultural changes driven by cycling on a global scale. Delegates attending the conference will be involved in the areas of delivering safe cycling facilities, technology, health, behavioural change, urban and infrastructure policies and mobility. 

Approximately 1500 delegates are scheduled to attend the event over the three-day period, providing a significant boost to the local economy.  The conference title is ‘Cycling for the Ages’ and will explore visions for the cycling city of the future and how we get there from the cycling city of today; how can we support and design to ensure measures taken are inclusive for all ages, gender, abilities and nationalities. 

“I’m very happy to lend my support to this important international conference. It’s an exciting event and it’s great to that Dublin City Council are hosting it. Encouraging and supporting people to walk and cycle is crucial to help meet our climate action challenge, tackling congestion and making our cities more liveable places. That’s why this Government is increasing the funding available to support the development of safe cycling infrastructure across the country both in urban areas, like Dublin city, and rural areas, through our new Greenways Strategy”, said Shane Ross TD, Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport.

“This increased investment is supporting the delivery of a number of major projects in Dublin this year and over the coming years as the National Transport Authority continues to implement the Greater Dublin Area Cycle Network Plan, including the delivery of 200km of cycling infrastructure as part of the BusConnects programme,” he said.

One of the key social activities that Dublin City Council has organised for the delegates is a Bike Parade, which will take place on the afternoon of Wednesday the 26th of June. Delegates will travel along the Sutton to Sandycove (S2S) cycle route – one of Dublin City Council’s and the National Transport Authority’s flagship cycling projects, towards St. Anne’s Park. Joining them in the cycle parade will be a host of community groups, school children and cycling enthusiasts along the UNESCO designated Biosphere, a location that is one of the most highly designated and ecologically sensitive sites in the world.  ​ Upon arriving at the Park, there will be free family entertainment for all as well as a farmers’ market with foods such as artisan cheeses and preserves, organic meat, fresh baked bread, cakes and treats.

“We are delighted to host Velo-city 2019 and look forward to interesting and informative discussions from leaders in the cycling world”, said Owen Keegan, Chief Executive, Dublin City Council. “As part of our ongoing commitment to sustainable transport and delivering on our commitments to combating climate change, construction contracts will be awarded on three major cycleway projects in the city centre this year; the Clontarf to City Centre Cycleway, the Fitzwilliam Street Cycleway and the Royal Canal Way project; while design work is ongoing on the Dodder Greenway, Clonskeagh to City Centre, and the remaining sections of the Sutton to Sandycove Route (S2S). With the Liffey cycle route now out for public consultation all of these projects represent an important and exciting future for the city.”

“As a Smart City, we also constantly explore how technology can help increase cycling levels and we have worked in partnership with several companies and organisations trialling unique and smart solutions to promote and encourage cycling,” he said.

To coincide with Velo-city, Dublin City Council in partnership with Cycle Industries Europe and the European Cycling Federation, has announced the ‘Smart Pedal Pitch’, a search for the most innovative cycle tech solutions. Winning entries will get the chance to pitch to a global cycle audience as well as a panel of international judges from the tech and cycling world.

Over the course of the Velo-city Conference, sessions will focus on a broad range of engaging topics including; “Cycling & Climate Change – the opportunity”, “Cycling Road Space Design – to Share or Segregate”, Explaining and convincing for a better cycling city”. Keynote speakers at the Conference include; Owen Keegan, Chief Executive Dublin City Council, Anne Graham, CEO National Transport Authority, Philippe Crist, Advisor for Innovation and Foresight for the International Transport Forum (ITF) at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), former professional cyclist, Chris Boardman, Greater Manchester’s first ever Cycling and Walking Commissioner,  Lucy Saunders, public health specialist, urbanist and transport planner, creator of healthy Streets approach, Klaus Bondam, CEO of the Danish Cyclists’ Federation since 2014 and Amanda Ngabirano is an urban and regional planner, lecturing at Makerere University in Kampala and Vice President of the World Cycling Alliance in Africa. Conference Details

UN Global Road Safety Week

Dublin, 8 May 2017

Today marks the start of the UN’s Global Road Safety Week. All around the world, communities are coming together to organise events focused around the theme ‘Save Lives #SlowDown.’ “Speed is at the core of the global road traffic injury problem,” notes WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan. “If countries were to address just this key risk, they would soon reap the rewards of safer roads, both in terms of lives saved and increases in walking and cycling, with profound and lasting effects on health.” 54 people have been killed on Irish roads in 2017 already, of whom 21 were vulnerable road users (pedestrians, cyclists, motor cyclists and pillion passengers). Approximately one third of all these accident fatalities are speed related. Drivers need to make the pledge and act to Save Lives

#SlowDown.

This week will see the Garda Traffic Corps out in force, carrying out extra speed checks around Dublin. Love 30 will be holding a series of events on the 9 th of May, asking drivers to make the pledge to ‘Save Lives #SlowDown.’ At 8.15am schoolchildren from Scoil Chaitríona on Mobhi Road will be out giving drivers their views on why they should slow down. At 11 am on Tuesday 9 th May, Love 30 and the Garda Traffic Corps will be Monck Place, a known ‘rat run’ in Phibsboro, asking drivers to make the pledge to ‘Save Lives #SlowDown’. At 1pm on Tuesday 9 th May, a cross-party Oireachtas group of cycling TDs and Senators will be showing their support for this campaign at the Leinster House gates on Kildare Street.

Welcoming the initiative, Inspector Ronan Barry of the Garda Traffic Corps called on everyone to take part this week. “Slowing down isn’t just for UN Global Road Safety Week,” he said. “We all need to take responsibility for saving lives on our roads.” Love 30 is a coalition of cycling and community groups who campaign for lower speed limits to make our towns and cities safer and more pleasant places to live, work and play. “We are one group out of thousands of groups, all around the world, calling on drivers to slow down,” says Love 30’s Mairéad Forsythe. “We must accept that speed is a critical factor leading to deaths on our roads and change our behaviour accordingly.” Dublin Cycling Campaign are also supporting this intiative. “In Dublin alone 3 cyclists have been killed off their bikes this year already,” said Colm Ryder of the Dublin Cycling Campaign. “It is a frightening situation that cannot continue. We are delighted that An Garda Síochána are carrying out these urban speed checks.”

Contact: Love 30, Mairéad Forsythe, 086-8337577

UN Global Road Safety Week: 8 – 14 May 2017: The #SlowDown campaign operates on the principles of the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. On 11 May 2011, dozens of countries around the world kicked off the first global Decade of Action. From New Zealand to Mexico and the Russian Federation to South Africa, governments committed to taking new steps to save lives on their roads. The Decade of Action seeks to prevent road traffic deaths and injuries which experts project will take the lives of 1.9 million people annually by 2020. The Global Plan for the Decade of Action outlines steps towards improving the safety of roads and vehicles; enhancing emergency services; and building up road safety management generally.

It also calls for increased legislation and enforcement on speeding. More information

Love 30: Ireland has already seen 6 cyclists die on our roads this year, 3 of them in Dublin. Approximately one third of all accident fatalities are speed related. Drivers need to be cognizant of their speed levels and potential to kill or maim vulnerable road users (VRUs), particularly in urban areas. The Love 30 Campaign strongly supports the introduction of a 30 km/h speed limit on many roads in Irish towns and cities and, together with the Garda Traffic Corps, is supporting the UN’s Global Road Safety week with daily speed checks throughout the week across Dublin. More information

A BIG thanks to Trek

A sincere thanks to the distributors of Trek bicycles in Ireland for their generous donation to Cyclist.ie to support our work.
Centro are the latest of the Irish bicycle companies / importers to see the logic in supporting organised cycling advocacy so as to move cycling up the political priority list.
Trek president John Burke has long maintained that the bicycle industry should divert cash from marketing and R&D to help advocates and politicians create a bicycle friendly worldHear hear!
Worth checking out their website and some of the progressive cycling projects in various parts of the world they are supporting. Fair play to them!